HOW TO BUILD RAISED BEDS

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BUILDING RAISED BEDS


HOW TO BUILD RAISED BEDS

The Concept of Raised Beds

Have we noticed that we are now moving from the traditional to the more scientific method of raised bed gardening (above ground gardening) and this system is causing quite a stir amongst the gardening and horticultural community. We are always on the lookout for the next best thing in every aspect of our daily lives so this system fits nicely as being something different to the old.  People are getting very excited about the virtues of this system in their blogs and websites and especially how simple an idea it is. After all this system is just a rectangle box placed into the ground, we have added compost and topsoil and then began planting and sowing in this box and suddenly we have a raised bed garden. Here we have a new found system which is much more accomplished and advanced at growing either our flowers, plants or vegetables, than which we have been using for years –  ie, the open plan garden.

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The basics of raised beds;

Like the title of the article suggests – this is exactly what we have. Literally what we’ve got is a rectangle frame (4ft x 8ft approx) made from lengths of timber secured together with nails or screws preferably, located in a sunny level position in your garden. These raised bed frames are available as a flatpack package over the internet. Essentially one follows the set of instructions, gets it assembled  and we are now ready to begin planting. The whole idea is, that we are now gardening a selected space, where it is much easier to contain weeds, watering is more effective as moisture is retained within this enclosure and plants are proven to be a lot happier and healthier in their new surroundings. This system has introduced us to plant diversity and leads to a longer growing season, which will result in greater quality and ultimately better productive yields.

 

 

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Understanding raised beds;

If we are using this system for the first time there is no need to worry about whether this will be a winner or not. This is a tried and trusted method, which has been deemed an unparalleled success, yielding a far greater return for our investment and effort. The advantages are immediately visible to the user. This project will become an appealing, design feature of our backgarden for years to come and hopefully will serve and reward us well. We are now moving  towards becoming more self-sustainable and self-reliant. This system takes away the dredgery of back-breaking gardening as we knew it and we are now in the modern, almost scientific era of horticulture.

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Beginners advise;

To begin sewing in our new raised bed frame, as this is our first effort with the raised bed system, I would start with the simple, old reliables, like carrots, parsnips, onions, tomatoes and lettuces. These don’t require a great deal of care or attention – just plant in the ground and nature does the rest. We need to continuously monitor the watering and irrigationing situation in the early days of our planting as raised bed frames tend to dry out a little quicker. The soil mixture which we start out with is of paramount importance, if we use a mix of equal parts of peat, compost and topsoil; this should ensure good moisture retention going forward and give greater returns.

Happy gardening to all who try and succeed,

Philip Browne.

” The seeds of today are the fruit and flowers of tomorrow ”

 



6 Opinions

  • Sharon said:

    Hi Phil,

    Raised bed gardening has never crossed my mind. Absolutely agreed that this method helps people like me who has a bad back.

    I have a small backyard garden. Am sure this method will maximise the space too. I am already thinking, visualising how my herb garden looks like.

    Thank you for sharing this and Happy Gardening!
    Sharon

    Reply
    • admin said:

      Hi there Sharon,
      I hope this method will help you with your gardening plans and hopefully it will make life easier for you. I’m glad you like the idea, thanks again for your comments. Best wishes to you in the future and have a great 2017.
      Cheers…….PB

      Reply
  • Rina said:

    About 2 years ago I started to use raised beds for my tomatoes and I am so glad I did! It’s amazing how much better they grew than being in the ground. I used small ones though, so this this coming year I am thinking about building a few larger ones. Great informational article! Thank You

    Reply
    • admin said:

      Hi there Rina,

      Thanks for your kind comments and website feedback. I’m glad you liked the site and hopefully the information was of benefit to you. Happy gardening and again many thanks. Best wishes to you in 2017.

      Cheers..PB

      Reply
  • Kathy said:

    Hi Phil,
    Thank you for such wonderful advice! I love the idea of growing my own herbs and vegetables; however, I am physically handicapped, with limited mobility. This makes working in my garden nearly impossible; however, the idea of a raised bed, makes having my own garden a possibility. The raised height will make it more accessible for me and easier to attend. I have saved this article in my favorites so that I will have it handy when spring rolls around.
    Kathy

    Reply
    • admin said:

      Hi there Kathy,

      Thank you for your site feedback and comments., so sorry to hear about your mobility issues. Lets hope that you get a raised bed built to your specifications and that you can get out there gardening when spring comes around. ( its just around the corner ). Nothing is impossible and everything is possible. I’m glad that you are motivated by looking at this post. Thanks again for your kind appraisal and generous feedback.

      Wishing you the very best going forward, lots of love.

      Thanking you, Philip Browne

      Reply

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